A different kind of rubbish: a reporter’s tale

30/07/2009

Global for meblog bits


Update #2 from [A rubbish story].

Morning, bloggers!

Although it seemed by yesterday that the Brazilian rubbish story came to an end, Brazilian correspondent Simon Lane updated his blog on a different kind of “rubbish” stirring up Brazilian authorities.

Here’s a snippet of Simon’s Sell News blog here, hosted by our Global Radio News Ning network. Click on to read the full entry.

“Tourists Robbed in Rio Shock!” … THE LATEST !!!

Posted by Simon Lane on July 30, 2009 at 12:30am

“Two 23-year old English girls (women?) reported being robbed on Sunday here in Rio. Not exactly headline news except they were lying…” I started writing this story yesterday and was obliged to stop, thankfully, as I was asked to do a follow up on the rubbish story (toxic waste illegally imported from the UK). Well, sorry to be cruel, but now I realize there is no end to British rubbish in sight I must continue, if only to make a living. Read on.

Thanks again, Simon.

If you’re curious as to what all this rubbish is about, you can start at the beginning. It all began with a stranded ship containing illegally-imported rubbish (garbage) sitting off the Brazilian coast.

The first update to the rubbish story can be found here.

All the best,

Kim

–GFM Team


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Update on the Brazil rubbish story: the rubbish is on the move

29/07/2009

Global for meblog bits


An update from [A rubbish story].

Morning, bloggers!

A few days ago, we brought up a little blog report from one of Global Radio News’ Brazilian correspondents, Simon Lane.

Simon noticed that there was an awful lot of rubbish sitting just off the Brazilian coast, and wrote about the how’s and why’s on our Ning network, Sell News.

To quickly sum up, the rubbish – or shiploads of garbage – was from the United Kingdom, and arrived at the coast of Brazil to dump its load. However, the Brazilian government barred the rubbish cargo from Brazilian soil, and a political and media tussle began.

Simon’s first entry on the rubbish story is located here.

Our original blog post about the story is likewise here.

Today, Simon tells us that the rubbish is on the move again:

“Who’s going to recycle a condom?” – President Lula

Posted by Simon Lane on July 28, 2009 at 7:30pm

Everyone wants to know what’s happening to the 1 600 tons of toxic waste illegally imported from the UK into Brazil recently. Well, it’s all going back to the old country so get your masks on if they’re any left down at Boots. In fact, no less than 41 containers were sealed by IBAMA (Brazil’s Eco-cops) last week and should be on their way, if not now, then, er, shortly. The story, according to the laws of disproportionate tragedy, seems to have disappeared from the Brazilian press today – in vain did I seek a vituperative outburst in the letters’ pages but the natives still show great deference to bold empires – the last gem to hand being an amusing report by an O GLOBO correspondent from a couple of days ago. There’s a nice photo of Environment Minister Carlos Minc pointing to an open container in mask and outsize black gloves and a wonderful reaction from the president of the republic, Lula, on a visit to São Paulo: “They (rich countries) are so clean and pollution-conscious … but who’s going to recycle a condom?” Good point. Lula and Minister Minc are enjoying some moral high ground for a moment so let them have their turn … besides, there’s a clean view up there. Lula made it quite clear what he thought of everyone lecturing Brazil on “inhuman working conditions” (that must be the third thing people don’t like about this country I forgot to mention in my previous post) in sugar cane plantations, which produce one of Brazil’s principal exports, high-grade ethanol, which the Greenies love so much as it is reduces all those nasty emissions. But what price slavery if we can all breathe a bit better in the knowledge that sea levels will not, after all, be over our heads by Christmas? Let’s get some perspective here! As for the work in hand, everything is under control and running to schedule, the 1.3 million dollar fine for “crimes against the environment” (that’s one notch below genocide) gratefully received and stored for a special occasion. Let’s use that money wisely to celebrate global inclusiveness and safe-sex hedonism irrespective of social orientation. Waste not, want not …

Read the entry on our Ning, Sell News.

Special thanks for an e-mail from last night from a GFM blog reader. Their letter tipped us to the update in Brazil issued a few days ago, and we immediately rung up Simon to hear his voice from the ground.

Global for me enjoys working alongside you – it’s all about connecting you to the reporter behind the news desk.

So far we’ve covered this story with simple blogs and e-mails, but if you would like more comprehensive news coverage on this controversial rubbish, let us know. Hop over to our Suggest and Fund page for more information.

Cheers,

Kim

–GFM Team


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Join our discussions on Twitter. @GFMEditor

• Our Ning network, Sell News.

• Read our Global for me challenge. Make the news work for you.

Earth Journalism Awards

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A little blog maintenance: Challenge and Fund a Story pages are live

23/07/2009

Global for metidying up


Added pages: Challenge and Fund a Story

Afternoon, bloggers.

Global for me is getting a little bit bigger. We added a page for our Global for me challenge, as well as a Fund a Story page for story donations. Take a look.

Special thanks to those that’ve supported us as well as spread the word about our challenge. We thank you.

Remember, it’s all about connecting to the reporter behind the news desk. Make the news industry work for you.

Thanks for all of your support in making this endeavor grow.

Cheers,

Kim

–GFM Team


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Join our discussions on Twitter. @GFMEditor

• Read our Global for me challenge. Make the news work for you.

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Global for French just got a little more colorful

15/07/2009

Global for meen français…


Photo gallery for Global for French

Afternoon again, bloggers!

Busy day for the GFM Team, but we have one more thing to share with you today.

We updated our Global for French blog page with photos from South Kensington, the French area of London. Take a look.

A little preview, click the image to head to the Global for French blog page.

Until next time, au revoir.

Sincères salutations,

Catherine & Kim

–GFM Team


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“At the tip of the surge” – another video from Helmand, Afghanistan

08/07/2009

Global for me videoupdate


for [Stories from Helmand]

Morning, bloggers!

Freelancer Jerome Starkey continues to upload videos from Helmand, Afghanistan to his YouTube Channel.

Here’s a second video of his work in an area hard-hit by the war in Afghanistan, “At the tip of the surge.”

Thank you, Jerome.

Jerome is the first British journalist to report from this region without the military in over a year. It’s freelance reporting about the locals’ points of view: their opinion of foreign troops, the military surge and how war has affected their lives.

We’re not sure what else is in store from Jerome. Keep close watch on his channel to see what else he may upload in the coming days. We’ll be sure to keep close watch, too.

Kim

–GFM Team


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If you want to buy these stories for broadcast, contact CEO Henry Peirse of Global Radio News at henry@globalradionews.com.

Special thanks to Jerome Starkey for his work in the field.

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Video from Afghanistan’s “Little America” – founded 1950s, then forgotten

07/07/2009

Global for me videoupdate


for [Stories from Helmand]

Afternoon again, bloggers!

Jerome Starkey e-mailed us an update from Helmand, Afghanistan.

Jerome is reporting in an area hard hit by the war in Afghanistan, but he also uncovered a strange world leftover from years past: Little America, a region in Afghanistan that he describes as “build on the sand” by US aid dollars in the 1950s, then forgotten.

Here’s an update on Jerome’s work via his YouTube channel.

Thanks for your hard work, Jerome.

To our readers: if you’d like to see more, head over to Jerome’s YouTube channel to view more videos, or read our original blog post about his proposed work. More donations can help this story reach its fullest.

As always, feel free to contact or comment on this developing story.

Kim

–GFM Team


E-mail your story ideas to  

If you want to buy these stories for broadcast, contact CEO Henry Peirse of Global Radio News at henry@globalradionews.com.

Special thanks to Jerome Starkey for his work in the field.

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Stories from Helmand, Afghanistan – report or no report?

02/07/2009

Global for me Tickerjust in…


UPDATE: This story pitch was supported by users and produced by freelancer Jerome Starkey. The videos – “At the tip of the surge” and “Helmand’s Little America” – can be seen in our Exclusives section.

Morning, bloggers!

Kim here, with today’s possible story update from Global for me.

Consider this a fast-forming habit: on a weekly or even daily basis (pending on how news flies), GFM will look ahead and uncover story possibilities using our own resources.

Remember, GFM is an offshoot of freelance news agency, Global Radio News. And since our GRN parent manages 600 freelance correspondents throughout the world, occasionally a neat story may come up from where you least expect.

It’s all about connecting to the reporter behind the news desk – or in this case, the reporter working in the field.

So here’s something from one of our correspondents in Afghanistan…


Afghanistan correspondent Jerome Starkey

Stories from Helmand, Afghanistan

by Freelancer Jerome Starkey

HELMAND, Afghanistan – Exclusive report from the heart of Helmand, by freelancer Jerome Starkey, pictured right.

What do ordinary people in Afghanistan think about western troops, the Taliban and the renewed American military surge? A look into the politics and anxieties of wartime.

In the personal scope, how are displaced or separated families? What of those that have lost relatives since the bombs fell in 2001? How is life eight years later? A look into the human cost of war, on a local scale.

Also: a bizarre result of the 20th century. Afghans are quick to remind British troops of their three bloody defeats under the Raj decades ago, but bizarrely, in Lashkar Gah, locals have fond memories of the Americans. The town was largely built on US aid dollars in the 1950s as Moscow and Washington competed for influence. It used to be called “Little America.” There are rows of 1950s-style houses built for American development staff.

Today, that same aid infrastructure is used to irrigate the poppy fields, which often leads to money in Taliban pockets. It remains to be seen if American dollars can wean Afghani people off poppies and the Taliban.

From Jerome’s e-mail:

Sent: 21 June 12:48
Subject: Story Ideas: Lashkar Gah

A trips come together very last minute. I am heading down to Lashkar Gah tomorrow (from Kabul) on the first commercial air service in 30 years. I’m desperate to find a video buyer for a few complete packages.

As far as I know it will be the first time there’s been a British journalist in Lash, without the military, for a year – so it’s virgin territory in terms of access and stories.

GFM brings light to this story on the day of a new US troop surge under President Barack Obama, the first of his presidency. Read the full pitch on our main website here.


What’s next?

To get this story told, GFM needs both user interest and donations to pay for this correspondent’s work.

In this case, the donated money goes to freelancer Jerome Starkey, for working hard in the field and bringing this story to you.

Think of it as simply paying for a story you can’t find anywhere else.

Think on it, consider it. Share your ideas with us by e-mail or in the comment box below.

If you’re already interested in making this story happen, let us know straight away!

See you!

Kim

–GFM Team


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GFM would like to thank Flickr user shuttermonkey for the light bulb graphic used in this post.

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